LIGHTING: 3-Points - Notes v6

    Overall Goal, post 4 renders showing, 1-Point, 2-Point, 3-Point and a creative setup to your blog.  All renders must have the same same camera and position.

    • 1-Point Lighting
    • 2-Point Lighting
    • 3-Point Lighting

      <><><><><><>Watch video on 3-point lighting.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AcMX1RcNRYA</>

       

       New_New_3-point-light

      Overall Goal, post 4 renders to your blog: 1-point Lighting, 2-point Lighting,  3-point Lighting, & Final Render

      General Steps for Key Light:

      Three Point Lighting

      What is a 3-point lighting system and why are we learning it?  It is basically a lighting technique that was created to simulate real world lighting in a studio environment in Hollywood. The Three Point Lighting Technique is a standard method used in visual media such as video, film, still photography and computer-generated imagery. It is a simple but versatile system which forms the basis of most lighting. Once you understand three point lighting you are well on the way to understanding all lighting.

      A classical 3-point lighting scheme has three lights, a key light, fill light, and rim light.

      One Point Lighting  and Key Lights

      The key light is the main or the strongest light in the scene that illuminates your subject.   It  is also responsible for the over all exposure and defines the most visible shadows.  It could be from any main light source from the sun penetrating in a window sill to the spotlight on a stage. In a classical 3 point lighting setup. it is generally placed 30 to 45 degrees to the right or left of the camera. This range for the key light helps bring out more texture and form (dimension) in the subject.

      Punk

       

      </> </>
      </> <><><></>

      </>

      </>

      </>

        <><><>
        </>
          </>
            </>
          Here is an example of a model with 1-point lighting. She is only lit with a “key” light.
          New_1-point light
          Here is a 1-Point setup with the abstract shape.  The light is essentially in the same location as the models but our shape is completely different and captures more light.

           

          3-Point_LightA general overview of my steps . . .

          Create Key Light: Create a spot light Create > Lights > Spot Light then while the light is selected in the side orthographic views choose Panel > Look through Selected. Also label the light “Key_Light” then manipulate the light accordingly, placing it about 30 to 40 degrees to to left or right of the camera.

          Look_through_Selected

          The goal it to look through the light so that the shadow reaches across the scene into the darkness.  Setup the light similar to as seen below.  *Note there is no shadow until you activate ray tracing.  When you switch the render engine to Mental Ray, ray tracing is automatically activated.

          Light_Render-1

          Set Render to Mental Ray: Open render settings and change render using . . . Switch to Mental Ray.  Notice when you render again using Mental Ray, a shadow appears – Mental Ray automatically turns on ray tracing.

          Turning on Mental Ray:
          If it does not appear, activate it by: Window > Settings/Preferences > Plug-in Manager > then check the boxes for Mayatomr.mll.

          Light_Render-2

              Decay Rate: Changing Decay Rate controls how quickly the light’s intensity decreases over distance.  The default setting is No Decay.  I generally try to similar real world lighting, hence I use Quadratic Decay.

              No Decay:  no decay; light reaches everything

              Linear: light intensity decreases directly (linearly) with distance (slower than real world light)

              Quadratic: light intensity decreases proportionally with the square of distance (the same as real world light)

              Cubic: light intensity decreases proportionally with the cube of distance (faster than real world light)

               

              Change Decay Rate to Quadratic and the scene should get really dark.  *Now the light is based on distance; if you move the light in closer, the scene will get brighter.

              Decay-menu

              Light_Render-3

               

              Notice there is not enough light now.  Change intensity until the subject has enough light.  *Now the light is based on distance; if you move the light in closer, the scene will get brighter.

              Decay-menu
              Light_Render-4

               

              Light_Render-5

              Light_Render-6

              Light_Render-7

              Light_Render-8 

              Light_Render-9 

              Light_Render-10 

              Light_Render-12 

              Light_Render-13 

              Light_Render-14 

              Light_Render-15 

              Light_Render-16 

              Light_Render-17 

              Light_Render-18 

              Light_Render-19

              SHADOWS There are two main choices for shadows Raytrace and Depth Map.  Depth map shadows and ray traced shadows produce similar results, Capture52though depth map shadows usually take less time to render. Maya documentation suggests to choose depth map shadows unless they cannot accomplish your visual goal; I disagree.  The quality and control is more superior with Raytraced shadows and that is what I generally use.   

              On your main light, the "Key light,” activate Ray Traced Shadows, check Use Ray Traced Shadows, and change the light radius to somewhere between  1–10, (it could be lager or smaller) it all depends on the scale of the  scene and  the distance the camera is from the main objects.   The shadow rays adjusts the quality of the shadow.  This can drastically slow down your render times.    I tend to start with at least 10 and increase it to may 40 for the final render.  This will remove the “grittiness” in the shadow.

              • Light Radius

                – This defines the area from which the light is coming. The larger the Radius, the softer our shadows will be.

            • Shadow Rays – Increasing this will increase the samples of our shadow quality, but will also increase our render times.

            • <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>Ray Depth Limit – Is the limit of how many times the light ray will bounce from one surface to another.</> </></>

                1st Render – One Point Perspective: Key Light with ray traced shadows.

                Save render as 1-Point_Perspective and make sure you change it to a JPG format.

                • Post render in Blog.

                KEY LIGHT with FILL LIGHT

                The fill light should be able to reduce and control the amount of shadows created. The idea is not to totally remove the shadows but to maintain a good ratio between main light and fill light. Different ratio gives you different feel so you have to do a lot of experimentation.  The fill light helps fill the shadows that the main light casts, basically it simulates the ambient light .   NEEDS MORE

                  Here is an example of a model with 2-point lighting. She is lit very evenly with both a “key” light and a “fill” light.

                New_2-point light 

                Here is a 2-Point setup with the abstract shape.   The “key” light has not changed from the 1st render.  The “fill” light softly fills in the shadows made by the “key” light. 

                Create Fill Light: Create a spot light Create > Lights > Spot Light then while each light is selected in one of the orthographic views choose Panel > Look through Selected. Also label the light“Fill Light” then Manipulate each light accordingly placing it about 30 to 40 degrees to to left or right of the camera.

                Fill Light Shadows On your "fill" light, activate ray traced shadows, check Use Ray Traced Shadows, and change the light radius to about 10 , it can be anything, but the objective is to soften the shadows from this direction.   The shadow rays adjusts the quality of the shadow. This can drastically slow down your render times. I tend to start with at least 10 and increase it to may 40 for the final render.   This will remove the “grittiness” in the shadow.

                 

                  2nd Render – Two Point Perspective: Key Light with ray traced shadows.

                  Save render as 2-Point_Perspective and make sure you change it to a JPG format.

                  • Post render in Blog.

                  KEY LIGHT, FILL LIGHT and RIM LIGHT

                  Classic three point lighting set up.

                  New_3-point light

                  Here is a 3-Point setup with the abstract shape.

                   

                •  

                    3rd Render – Three Point Perspective:

                    Key Light with ray traced shadows.

                    Fill Light with Soft ray traced shadows.

                    Rim Light with Soft ray traced shadows.

                    Save render as 3-Point_Perspective and make sure you change it to a JPG format.

                    • Post render in Blog.

                    <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

                    </></></></></></></></></></></></></></>
                    </>

                    Rim Light Shadows On your "fill" light, activate ray traced shadows, check Use Ray Traced Shadows, and change the light radius to about 10 , it can be anything, but the objective is to soften the shadows from this direction. The shadow rays adjusts the quality of the shadow. This can drastically slow down your render times. I tend to start with at least 10 and increase it to may 40 for the final render. This will remove the “grittiness” in the shadow.

                      4th Render – Three Point Perspective Final Render:

                      Key Light with ray traced shadows.

                      Fill Light with Soft ray traced shadows.

                      Rim Light with Soft ray traced shadows.

                      Save render as 3-Point_Perspective and make sure you change it to a JPG format.

                      • Post render in Blog.

                      <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
                      </></></></></></></></></></></></></></>
                      </>

                       

                      This is what it look like from the top view.  The lights are not really setup the way we want them to be, we will change this in a bit.  This is just the initial setup.

                      Label all the lights:  Key Light, Fill Light, & Rim Light.

                      Turn off both the Fill and Rim light:  Select each light and in the Attribute Editor change their Intensity to 0.

                      Capture49 

                      FINAL RENDER     3-Point Lighting

                      CREATIVE LIGHTING

                      Two Point lighting: Hard “Key” light from the right side and hard “Rim” Light from the back left. Ambient light slightly revels the subject.

                      Two Point lighting: Hard “Key” light from the right side and soft warm  “Fill" Light from the front left.

                      Soft cool textured light.

                        1. All the lights were hard sources and upstage for this shot.

                        2. One Lupo 800 light was all I used plus a bit of magic. Continuous light is perfect for this kind of effect because what you see is what you get. White balance was 3800k.

                        3. We then broke off from f/16 and opened up to f/2.8 for a bit of a shake up. The light here was daylight coming through my open door in the studio.

                        4. Next it was time to shoot the same corner with continuous light. The Lupo 1200 provided the slash of light while the Lupo 800 was warming up as an area flood. The warm up period gives a green light, it soon passes to reveal pure white light.

                        5. Pop the white balance to 2600k for a bit of blue action

                        6. One Lupo 800 light was all I used plus a bit of magic. Continuous light is perfect for this kind of effect because what you see is what you get. White balance was 3800k.

                            New_3-point-light-2

                            Great Rendering Article.

                            http://www.fxguide.com/featured/the-art-of-rendering/

                            Talk about indirect lighting.

                            In our case, the main light source is in the ceiling. Look at the top your hand, why is the bottom of your hand not completely in the shadows?

                            Reflecting

                            Light is a transverse, electromagnetic wave that can be seen by humans.

                            The photon the basic "unit" of light

                            Any light that you see is made up of a collection of one or more photons propagating through space as electromagnetic waves. In total darkness, our eyes are actually able to sense single photons, but generally what we see in our daily lives comes to us in the form of zillions of photons produced by light sources and reflected off objects. If you look around you right now, there is probably a light source in the room producing photons, and objects in the room that reflect those photons. Your eyes absorb some of the photons flowing through the room, and that is how you see.

                            For instance, a photon in the visible spectrum would contain an energy of approximately 4 X (10 to the power of -19) joules Thus, a perfectly efficient 100-watt light bulb would emit approximately 2.5 X (10 to the power of 20) photons per second.

                             

                            HDRI image

                            If I put a chrome ball in a black room, what would it look like? Reflective material is directly dependent on the environment.

                             

                            HDRI IMAGES HERE: http://www.pauldebevec.com/Probes/